LGBTQ Youth in Montana

LGBTQ Youth in Montana

November 2017

Daphne Herling, Montana KIDS COUNT

LGBTQ youth face many challenges to being accepted by family and community, and are subjected to high levels of peer bullying and violence at school.  What are the issues LGBTQ youth in Montana face? How do we create supportive, inclusive environments that keep our children safe and connected?

View/Download this Document
2017 Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children

2017 Race for Results: Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children

October 2017

Annie E Casey Foundation

Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2017 Race for Results Report: Building a Path to Opportunity, examines the question: do all children have equal opportunity in the US?  Through the use of 12 indicators that serve as benchmarks, an index score is created for different racial groups, as well as for children in immigrant families.  Disparities in opportunity become apparent.  In Montana, American Indian children face the greatest obstacles to opportunities for success.  Policy recommendations, rooted in the research, are provided.

View/Download this Document
Gender Pay Inequality in the U.S. and Montana

Gender Pay Inequality in the U.S. and Montana

February 2017

Daphne Herling

Americans have long held certain core values; high on the list are opportunity for all and equality of all. Gender wage inequality runs counter to both of these values. The reality is that the American Dream –if you are determined and work hard you will get ahead – is increasingly unattainable by many struggling families. Addressing gender wage inequality is an important step to ensuring more women and families can support their children and help them thrive. What is lost because of the current wage gap in Montana? It is estimated that the combined total loss due to gender pay inequality is more than $1.4 billion. In other words, because of the $12,680 gap between the average pay for men and women working full-time, year-round, dollars are not going into raising families, supporting local businesses and fueling the economy in general.

View/Download this Document
Co-Occurring Disorders in Montana Youth

Co-Occurring Disorders in Montana Youth

October 2016

Daphne Herling

Co-occurring disorder (COD) is when one person has two or more disorders at the same time, a mental illness and a substance use disorder. This Montana KIDS COUNT report, explores the issue of co-occurring disorders in Montana youth: providing definitions, history and context; exploring challenges for individuals and systems; and highlighting opportunities for treatment.

View/Download this Document
Creating Opportunities for Families A Two-Generation Approach

Creating Opportunities for Families A Two-Generation Approach

KIDS COUNT Policy Report released 11/12/2014

By the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Nearly half of the nation’s families with young children struggle to make ends meet. A new KIDS COUNT policy report makes the case for creating opportunity for families by addressing the needs of parents and their children simultaneously. Creating Opportunity for Family: A Two-Generation Approach describes the Foundation’s two-generation approach, which calls for connecting families with early childhood education, job training and other tools to achieve financial stability and break the cycle of poverty, and recommends ways to help equip families with what they need to thrive.

View/Download this Document
Measuring Access to Opportunity In the United States

Measuring Access to Opportunity In the United States

KIDS COUNT Policy Report released 5/12/2014

By the Annie E. Casey Foundation

At a time when the best-possible data are being used to drive decisions, we as a country need to use the most accurate, reliable measurements of poverty.  We need to understand how programs that lift families out of poverty are working because we know that growing up economically deprived can have a profound and negative impact on children’s education achievement and puts them at greater risk of other poor outcomes as adults.

Measuring Access to Opportunity in the United States points to a better index for measuring poverty – the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM)- which captures the effect of safety net programs and tax policies on families.

View/Download this Document
Getting and Keeping Business Involved – Tips for Montana Early Childhood Leaders

Getting and Keeping Business Involved – Tips for Montana Early Childhood Leaders

A Publication Produced by Montana KIDS COUNT

The guide is intended to help early childhood leaders work effectively with business partners, policy makers and other leaders. It offers tips drawn from research and experience on how to create and sustain successful partnerships with the business community. It is designed for current and future early childhood leaders who want to create sustainable relationships with business and policy makers as well as those who want to expand existing partnerships. This document provides real tips and examples of how to build, communicate, and understand the importance of business collaborations to sustain early childhood efforts.

View/Download this Document
Race for Results – Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children

Race for Results – Building a Path to Opportunity for All Children

4/2014

KIDS COUNT Policy Report released 2014

In this policy report, the Annie E. Casey Foundation explores the intersection of kids, race and opportunity. The report features the new Race for Results index, which compares how children are progressing on key milestones across racial and ethnic groups at the national and state level. The index is based on 12 indicators that measure a child’s success in each stage of life, from birth to adulthood, in the areas of early childhood; education and early work; family supports; and neighborhood context. The report also makes four policy recommendations to help ensure that all children and their families achieve their full potential.

View/Download this Document
The First Eight Years – Giving kids a foundation for lifetime success

The First Eight Years – Giving kids a foundation for lifetime success

Released 11/4/2013

Kids Count Policy Report

Behind a toddler’s soft features and halting first steps, an unseen, but extremely high-stakes, activity is taking place — the building of a brain. What happens to children during those critical first years will determine whether their maturing brain has a sturdy foundation or a fragile one.

This is a policy report that aligns with work that Montana KIDS COUNT has engaged in in the past:

Economic Returns for Investing In Children’s Health
By Dr. Steve Seninger, The University of Montana

View/Download this Document
Reducing Youth Incarceration

Reducing Youth Incarceration

February 5, 2013

KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot

We join with the Annie E. Casey Foundation in raising awareness of the declining youth incarceration rate in the United States. In its latest KIDS COUNT data snapshot, the Casey Foundation finds that the rate of young people locked up because of trouble with the law dropped more than 40 percent over a 15-year period, with no decrease in public safety. The snapshot indicates that the number of young people in correctional facilities on a single day fell to 70,792 in 2010, from a high of 107,637 in 1995. The publication also recommends ways to continue reducing reliance on incarceration and improve the odds for young people involved in the justice system.

View/Download this Document
Family-Friendly Workplaces – A Guide for Montana Businesses

Family-Friendly Workplaces – A Guide for Montana Businesses

Produced By Montana KIDS COUNT - Original Content by Billie Warford, Early Childhood Solutions

It’s Good Business to Invest in a Family-Friendly Workplace

Montana business leaders recognize that the key to strengthening the state’s economy is keeping struggling companies in business while also creating new jobs In Montana, 98 percent of the businesses are small and profit margins are low. Many Montana businesses already have family-friendly workplace policies, including flexible work hours, personal days instead of vacation or sick days, or the option to work from home.

Montana businesses can be even more productive by helping their employees balance work and family demands. This guide is designed to help Montana businesses understand family-friendly workplace options and why they are important to their employees, our communities, and our children. It also provides resources and information on how to implement changes in your workplace to help employees and families.

View/Download this Document
Youth and Work

Youth and Work

Kids Count Policy Report released 12/3/2012

Restoring teen and young adult connections to opportunity

Today—with millions of jobs lost and experienced workers scrambling for every available position—America’s young people stand last in line for jobs.

Youth employment is at its lowest level since World War II; only about half of young people ages 16 to 24 held jobs in 2011. Among the teens in that group, only 1 in 4 is now employed, compared to 46 percent in 2000. Overall, 6.5 million people ages 16 to 24 are both out of school and out of work, statistics that suggest dire consequences for financial stability and employment prospects in that population.

View/Download this Document
Early Warning! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters

Early Warning! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters

A report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation

The ability to read is central to a child’s success in school, life-long earning potential, and the ability to contribute to the nation’s economy and its security. The Foundation released its KIDS COUNT Special Report, Early Warning! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters to focus attention on the critical importance of achieving grade-level reading proficiency for all children by the end of third grade.

View/Download this Document
Montana’s Comprehensive Needs Assessment for Substance Abuse Prevention

Montana’s Comprehensive Needs Assessment for Substance Abuse Prevention

By Steve Seninger & Daphne Herling

This report is the updated Needs Assessment for Substance Abuse Prevention which reviews data used in the 2007 report and compares it to the most recent data available.  It also includes additional research and analysis undertaken by Montana’s State Epidemiological Workgroup to expand our understanding of the consequences and consumption related to Montana’s alcohol abuse problems.

View/Download this Document
The Economic Cost of Alcohol Abuse in Montana

The Economic Cost of Alcohol Abuse in Montana

By Patrick M. Barkey

This article summarizes a Bureau study, which found that alcohol abuse costs the Montana economy more than a half a billion dollars per year in medical costs, lost wages, and productivity. The study examined the question: What resources would be available to the economy- that could be used on other priorities- if there were no abuse of alcohol?

View/Download this Document
The Working Poor

The Working Poor

Summer 2012

Montana Business Quarterly

In 2010, there were 10.5 million individuals classified as working poor in the US: people who spent at least 27 weeks in the labor force- that is, working or looking for work- but whose income still fell below the official poverty level. Who are the working poor in Montana, and what obstacles do they face?

View/Download this Document
2008 Teen and Motor Vehicle Crash Data Analysis

2008 Teen and Motor Vehicle Crash Data Analysis

By Carole Cochran, Thale Dillon, & Daphne Herling

The research explored child and teen deaths from motor vehicle crashes in two parts:quantitative statistical analysis and qualitative data from case studies. The statistical analysis used National KIDS COUNT demographic, social and economic data for all 50 states to determine their influence on child/teen mortality.

View/Download this Document