Montana Kids in Motion

Montana Kids in Motion

MONTANA KIDS COUNT ISSUE BRIEF - VOL 5, NO 1 WINTER 2016

by Daphne Herling

Data shows that our children in Montana tend to be more physically active than their peers in other states, whether it is at home, in school, in the community or in the outdoors. To many of us who live in Montana, this is intuitively obvious given the culture and access to the outdoors. But what difference does being physically active actually make to children? This issue brief looks at how physical activity in all settings can improve the lives of children; active kids tend to be physically healthier, and more emotionally resilient and mentally acute than their sedentary peers. We report on social issues where often Montana kids fare worse than their peers in other states; but, regarding children engaging in physical activities, we are happy to report that Montana kids are doing well.

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Suicide: Losing Lives in Montana

Suicide: Losing Lives in Montana

Montana KIDS COUNT Issue Brief - Vol 4, No 1 Spring 2015

By Daphne Herling and Thale Dillon

That young people in our state take their own lives at over twice the national rate is alarming and compels us to investigate and dig deeper into the data related to the issue, to better understand why and how, in order to prevent the tragic loss of life. In addition to an examination of suicide-related data, this issue brief explores evidence-based prevention programs and prevention policies.

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SEAT BELTS: Saving Lives on Montana Roads

SEAT BELTS: Saving Lives on Montana Roads

Montana KIDS COUNT Issue Brief - Vol 3, No 1 Summer 2014

By Daphne Herling

In a car that crashes while traveling at 35 mph, an unrestrained rear-seat passenger can cause as much damage to the driver as a fall from a height of 40 ft onto a hard surface. This is one of the dangers of not using a seat belt which is often overlooked, according to a paper recently released by Montana KIDS COUNT at the Bureau of Business & Economic Research at the University of Montana. The paper, entitled SEAT BELTS: Saving Lives on Montana Roads, explores traffic fatalities associated with not being buckled while riding in a car, with particular focus on keeping children safe.

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Children in Working Poor Families

Children in Working Poor Families

Montana KIDS COUNT Issue Brief - Vol 2, No 1 Winter 2013

By Thale Dillon

Having parents in the labor force can reduce a child’s odds of growing up in poverty almost six-fold; however parental employment does not guarantee financial security.  In 2010, there were an estimated 34,000 working families in this state who were low-income, or working poor.  And nothing predicts bad outcomes in children more powerfully than growing up poor.

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Graduation Counts

Graduation Counts

Montana KIDS COUNT Issue Brief - Vol 1, No 2 Summer 2012

By Daphne Herling and Thale Dillon

The transition from high school student to young adult is a critical one. Young people will enter into young adulthood as they head to college, the workforce or into whatever life has to offer – with or without the life skills and educational skills they need. Thus there is much riding on high school graduation and all that goes before it, and there are serious consequences for those who fail to obtain a high school diploma.

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When Children Go Hungry

When Children Go Hungry

Montana KIDS COUNT issue brief - Vol 1 no. 1 Spring 2012

By Thale Dillon and Daphne Herling

The cumulative consequences of children growing up without proper nourishment are far-reaching and serious. Not only does the lack of proper nutrition lead to poor health, it also limits children’s long-term cognitive and socio- emotional development. In recent years, food insecurity and hunger have become problems faced by an increasing number of children, strongly impacting the health, academic performance, and employability of an entire generation.

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